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Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse
Hellboy II: The Golden Army
Hey! Hey! USA
The House Bunny
How to Train Your Dragon

Hearts of Darkness: A Filmaker’s Apocalypse
(1991)

I hadn't seen this since it first came out. Entertaining to witness again what a jack-ass Dennis Hopper was, and disturbing to see just how messed up Sheen was in that breakdown scene. As fine a document of the madness of filmmaking as you're likely to see.

****


Hellboy 2: The Golden Army
(2008)

Consummate comic book movie-making from Guillermo Del Toro. Doug Jones' Abe Sapien is particularly affecting, and Johann Krauss is wonderfully achieved. 

It also achieves the physicality of the films of the pre-CGI era, and that's something to be lauded. I am, however, beginning to think Del Toro should get over his obsession with cogs'n'wheels mechanics.
 ****

Hey! Hey! USA
(1938)

Oh dear. Will Hay refers to a "little nigger boy" and after he and the annoying young rascal he has to rescue fall down a coal shute they emerge at just the right juncture to integrate themselves seamlessly into an emancipation rally and thus elude their captors.

** 

The House Bunny
(2008)

An extra star for Anna Faris' ripe arse. That, and her considerable comedy talents (wasted on this), aside there's not much to recommend. The slightly offensive plot has a frat house of nerdy girls discover their true potential when Faris gives them make-overs.

**



The House that Dripped Blood
(1971)

Horror anthology where Doctor Who gets the winner, with Jon Pertwee facing off against Catweazle. Pertwee's a hoot and the jokes about cheap, crappy horror movies are nicely done. Denholm Elliot’s sequence is probably second, even if "Dominic" looks like Oddbod from Carry on Screaming. Cushing's segment is probably the weakest.

***



How to Train Your Dragon
(2010)

Charming Dreamworks animation, that somehow escaped their clutches without being drowned in pop culture references and songs. The dragon of the title is adorable, possibly because it has a decidedly feline quality.

**** 


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