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These gypsy tears will keep you safe.

Borat Subsequent Moviefilm
(2020)

(SPOILERS) I wasn’t going to watch globalist stooge Sacha Baron Cohen’s Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan. I’m not a fan of sub-Beadle’s About comedy cruelty generally, however “justified” the recipients are, and I was even less keen to see another incarnation of this “public service” format where Cohen valiantly exerts every propagandising tool in the book to shame those who aren’t on the same page. Not square with the liberal Hollywood bubble/MSM spin on the world? Dare to speculate about conspiracy theories? Sacha will set you straight. So why did I change my mind and give Borat 2 a look? Well, I figured, since the new-improved woke Oscars were giving it some attention – Baron Cohen is fully aboard the woke train, obviously, by satirical inversion, right down to the hate-based intolerance (that justified comedy cruelty again) – I’d investigate what he’d done to wow them so. My takeaway? Yes, Maria Bakalova is clearly a talented comic actress. She deserves better.

Borat Subsequent Moviefilm, timed to inflict maximum damage prior to the election – what, in case the vote rigging didn’t work? In case voters required a vulgar smut merchant to sway their opinion at the last minute? – also summoned (probably the best word) a nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. I don’t think anyone seriously believes it’s going to win statuettes for either, but it represents a “We stand with you, even though we, like you, aren’t too sure about just what it is our masters are up to this time, but we’ll play along obediently just like we always have” salute. The same is true for Baron Cohen’s two-decades-too-old caricature of a performance in The Trial of the Chicago 7. He’s been a good and dutiful servant this last year.

Baron Cohen repackages the same old jokes for the same good liberal cause in much the same way as Michael Moore and his partiality-infused documentaries. You know, before everyone decided Moore was too much of a pillock to have boosting their team. So as before, if you extol or sympathise with any of the areas targeted by Borat, you are, by association, reprehensible scum, morally and mentally backward and enormously off-piste. The best way to sledgehammer this home is to pick as victims idiots, naïfs or those too polite to say anything; all are equally guilty under Baron Cohen’s sociopathic gaze. Sowing division and embracing excoriation is the determining factor here. All crimes deserve equal vilification, should you condone or saying nothing in response to obtuse baiting in relation to sexism, racism, anti-Semitism, incest, anti-abortion, holocaust denial, pandemic denial, vax refusal, adrenochrome belief, QAnon belief or Republicanism generally. It’s surely no coincidence that Guantanamo Hanks – or was it his brother – cameos, given he’s been the focus of much of the adreno-talk. A public service from Baron Cohen then, to clear all that up.

Baron Cohen’s comedy thrives insidiously on the “They have it coming” premise of confronting people with assumed ingrained vices or bigotry (he knows who they are just by looking at them); the key is for them to react in the wrong way. Being the “right” way for Baron Cohen’s dirty little enterprise (everyone, that is, except for Jews in synagogues sending out the right positive messages). In contrast, it’s okay to be racist and sexist and homophobic and oppose free speech as long as it’s acceptable racism and sexism and homophobia, and you’re still free to speak, and you’re popular/endorsed by the media. Accordingly then, every one of Baron Cohen’s underlying stances is in support of the MSM; if you find yourself at variance with that in any fundamental way, he will ferret out your viewpoint as either untrue (a fact) or invalid (a position).

In addition to his politically-correct incorrectness, Baron Cohen’s penchant for puerile shock humour is alive and unwell, serving up various repetitions of mocking those prudish enough to prefer not to have dick pics repeatedly shoved in their faces, or Borat squatting to take a shit, or his daughter performing a fertility dance while surfing the crimson wave. And then there’s the crapstick, bargain-basement straining for laughs – Borat doesn’t understand phones! Borat surfs porn! Borat wanks! Borat kisses a man! Borat wears a John Landis disguise! (Perhaps that one wasn’t intentional.) Borat dresses as Klansman! Borat wears a Trump suit!

Curiously, I noticed Baron Cohen as Borat doesn’t wear a mask or observe social distancing when he visits Jeanise Jones. So he’s either mocking the deadliness of the plandemic and those who believe it to be deadly, or he’s staged a scene in which his character gets a cheap laugh about the deadliness of the plandemic, the same deadly plandemic he is elsewhere validating (“Oh no, the Americans are victorious in their battle against science”). Either way, way to go Sacha.

Some have suggested Baron Cohen has not only played Mossad but he is Mossad. Borat Subsequent Moviefilm certainly knows the correct buttons to push in psychological warfare operations, and Baron Cohen would surely love to be crowned ringmaster/ court jester of the great game as it reaches its crescendo. Unlikely, though, as long as he’s also making Grimsbys. I seem to recall I was reasonably positive about The Dictator, although Anna Faris may have been a significant part of that. I doubt I’ll make that mistake again. One star (and that’s for Bakalova).

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