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The Avengers

Season One

1. Hot Snow
6. Girl on the Trapeze
15. The Frighteners
20. Tunnel of Fear


Season Two

1. Mission to Montreal
2. Dead on Course
3. The Sell-Out
4. Death Dispatch
5. Propellant 23
6. Mr. Teddy Bear
7. The Decapod
8. Bullseye
9. The Removal Men
10. The Mauritius Penny
11. Death of a Great Dane
12. Death on the Rocks
13. Traitor in Zebra
14. The Big Thinker
15. Intercrime
16. Warlock
17. Immortal Clay
18. Box of Tricks
19. The Golden Eggs
20. School for Traitors
21. White Dwarf
22. Man in the Mirror
23. Conspiracy of Silence
24. A Chorus of Frogs
25. Six Hands Across a Table
26. Killer Whale

Seasons 1 & 2 Ranked


Season Three

1. Concerto

2. Brief for Murder
3. The Nutshell
4. The Golden Fleece
5. Death a La Carte
6. Man with Two Shadows
7. Don't Look Behind You
8. The Grandeur That Was Rome
9. The Undertakers
10. Death of a Batman
11. Build a Better Mousetrap
12. November Five
13. Second Sight
14. The Secrets Broker
15. The Gilded Cage
16. Medicine Men
17. White Elephant
18. Dressed to Kill
19. The Wringer
20. The Little Wonders
21. Mandrake
22. Trojan Horse
23. The Outside-In Man
24. The Charmers
25. Esprit de Corps
26. Lobster Quadrille

Season Three Ranked


Season Four

1. The Town of No Return

2. The Murder Market
3. The Master Minds
4. Dial a Deadly Number
5. Death at Bargain Prices
6. Too Many Christmas Trees
7. The Cybernauts
8. The Gravediggers
9. Room Without a View
10. A Surfeit of H2O
11. Two's a Crowd
12. Man-Eater of Surrey Green
13. Silent Dust
14. The Hour That Never Was
15. Castle De'ath
16. The Thirteenth Hole
17. Small Game for Big Hunters
18. The Girl From Auntie
19. Quick-Quick Slow Death
20. The Danger Makers
21. A Touch of Brimstone
22. What the Butler Saw
23. The House That Jack Built
24. A Sense of History
25. How to Succeed... At Murder
26. Honey for the Prince

Season Four Ranked


Season Five

1. The Fear Merchants
2. Escape in Time
3. The Bird Who Knew Too Much
4. From Venus With Love
5. The See-Through Man
6. The Winged Avenger
7. The Living Dead
8. The Hidden Tiger
9. The Correct Way to Kill
10. Never, Never Say Die
11. Epic
12. The Superlative Seven
13. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Station
14. Something Nasty in the Nursery
15. The Joker
16. Who's Who???
17. Death's Door
18. Return of the Cybernauts
19. Dead Man's Treasure
20. The £50,000 Breakfast
21. You Have Just Been Murdered
22. Murdersville
23. The Positive-Negative Man
24. Mission... Highly Improbable

Season Five Ranked


Season Six

1. The Forget-Me-Knot
2. Invasion of the Earthmen
3. The Curious Case of the Countless Clues
4. Split!
5. Get-A-Way
6. Have Guns - Will Haggle
7. Look - (Stop Me If You've Heard This One) But There Were These Two Fellers...
8. My Wildest Dream
9. Whoever Shot Poor George Oblique Stroke XR40?
10. You'll Catch Your Death
11. All Done with Mirrors
12. Super Secret Cypher Snatch
13. Game
14. False Witness
15. Noon-Doomsday
16. Legacy of Death
17. They Keep Killing Steed
18. Wish You Were Here
19. Killer
20. The Rotters
21. The Interrogators
22. The Morning After
23. Love All
24. Take Me To Your Leader
25. Stay Tuned
26. Fog
27. Who Was That Man I Saw You With?
28. Pandora
29. Thingumajig
30. Homicide and Old Lace
31. Requiem
32. Take-Over
33. Bizarre

Season Six Ranked

Ranked: 139-71

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